Translational Pre-Clinical Models of COVID-19

Panel Discussion

May 13th, 2021 at 11:00am EST

SCIREQ will be hosting a free virtual panel discussion with leading preclinical infectious disease researchers focusing on Preclinical Modelling of COVID-19.

Over the past year, critical research efforts have been aimed at understanding the transmission, clinical manifestation and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infections. There has been much progress in identifying relevant in vitro and in vivo modelling for this disease for vaccine development and therapeutic intervention.

Learn more about the current research, as experts delve into the advantages and disadvantages of various COVID-19 animal models. There will also be a Q&A period, followed by a networking session at the end of the panel discussion! 

 

Date: Thursday May 13th, 2021
Time: 11:00am-12:30pm EST
Location: Virtual

Register Now

 

Meet the Panelists

DR. PAUL MCCRAY – UNIVERSITY OF IOWA

Dr. McCray’s research interests include airway epithelial cell biology ad COPD pathogenesis and treatment, host-pathogen interactions at the airway surface, and responses to bacterial and viral respiratory pathogens. Learn more about Dr. McCray’s research here

 

DR. WAYNE MITZNER –   JOHN’S HOPKINS UNIVERSITY

Dr. Mitzner’s primary research interests include the structural basis of physiologic lung function and how pathologic situations and environmental exposures can change lung function and structure. Learn more about the Mitzner lab here.

 
DR. ADAM BAILEY – WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY IN ST. LOUIS

Dr. Bailey’s lab focuses on furthering infectious disease research by developing animal models to study viral disease pathophysiology and evaluate the effectiveness of vaccines and new therapeutics. Learn more about Dr. Bailey here.

 
DR. IAN DAVIS – OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY

Dr. Davis’s research focuses on the pathophysiologic effects of pulmonary viral infections. More specifically, this group studies the impact of influenza A infections on alveolar epithelial cell function in a mouse model of influenza-induced ARDS. Learn more about the Davis lab here.